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Purchasing Guide

SECURITY ALERT (September 2011): Do NOT put phones on static IP addresses directly on the Internet. If there is no other option, you must at least disable port 80 (WWW) inbound to any phone device. If this precaution is not taken, OnSIP is not liable for any charges you may incur due to access to the phones.

 

Hardware Phones

OnSIP has teamed up with Telephony Depot to offer an online store exclusively offering phones that are pre-configured for easy setup with an OnSIP account. Our recommendations for Entry, Mid, and Executive-tier phones are indicated by gold stars.

As always, you are free to purchase your phones elsewhere if you wish, and our service is compatible with more phones than those offered in the store (we do not recommend purchasing phones secondhand as they may be locked down by other providers and difficult or impossible to unlock). If you have any questions regarding compatibility, we encourage you to call our Customer Success team prior to purchasing.

 

Software Phones

Free Applications

iPhone
Android
Desktop

We recommend the OnSIP app, our on-the-go business phone, and complete desk phone replacement. The app is available on the web at app.onsip.com (no plugins or downloads required). You can also download the desktop version for Mac and for Windows operating systems.

Additional free software desktop applications can be found HERE.

Purchase Application

To use our favorite cross-platform (Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad and Android phone support) software phone, visit CounterPath to purchase Bria.

 

Routers

Below are routers that we recommend with OnSIP Hosted PBX:

100 to 200 users

50 to 100 users

20 to 50 users

5 to 20 users

Up to 5 users

 

Example Scenario

A company of forty users in two separate offices wants to use OnSIP Hosted PBX for phone connectivity. What is the best investment for hardware and performance?

Solution

In our experience, Cisco and Polycom both have reliable and well performing equipment. We chose and tested the equipment featured in the scenario below based on our experience with a wide variety of routers and phones.

Cisco and Polycom scenario

Chicago

The Chicago office has ten users, who have PCs and Polycom phones. Users connect to OnSIP Hosted PBX for phone service and use my.onsip.com to communicate with their colleagues. The Cisco 871 is designed for an office of about this size. Here are our configuration instructions.

New York

The New York office has thirty users, who have PCs and Polycom phones. Users connect to OnSIP Hosted PBX for phone service and use my.onsip.com to communicate with their colleagues. The Cisco 1811 is designed for an office of about this size. Here are our configuration instructions.

 

Why Cisco Routers?

Cisco routers are a great favorite because of their reliability and performance. Furthermore they are one of the few routers on the market that we've found correctly implement a SIP ALG. ALGs are intended to assist various protocols in correctly traversing a NAT. While OnSIP does NAT detection on the server side to assist with this process (in the event that a router does not implement a SIP ALG), it is preferable for the remote device to be able to correctly handle ALG functionality when possible. Unfortunately many routers targeted at home office and small business environments have SIP ALGs which are broken.

When two phones are behind two different routers running NAT with functioning SIP ALGs, the media stream will take the shortest path between the two networks. This means that the packets use the most efficient network routes across the Internet and between the phones, rather than having to route through OnSIP proxy servers, which results in a better quality phone calls.

 

Updated January 2017

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    Kelly Clissold

    A question on the router listings: for the number of users, is that for total number of connections through the router, for the number of hardware and/or software phones, or for the number of concurrent phone connections? We have about 10 hardware phones, but only one or two in use at any one time, and triple that number of devices connecting to the 'net (workstations, etc).

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